CREATE YOUR COMPANY
UK Incorporation
You can now register your own UK company more easily, quickly and cost effectively then ever. Use our online service, or call the office, and your application will be submitted to Companies House instantly. You can start trading within 4h. We offer clean company formation.
SPECIAL SERVICE
For You Company
Register as a Self Employer
Our company can help you with registration as a self employer. Please see our service. Setting up as a self-employed sole trader is the simplest and quickest way to start a one-person business.
LTD Company Registration
Now with our company you can register your LTD company within 6-8 hours. This is on line registration. Your company will be register with your choice of companies’ officers and address. Price starts from £25.00!
PLC Company within 6-8h
Our company will form your PLC company within 6-8 hours. This is on line registration. Your company will be register with your choice all company officers and address. There is only one application to fill out.
Why not a LLP?
Our company will help you to register Limited Liability Partnership. Formation usually takes 7 days. Your company will be register with your choice all company members and address.
Accountancy
Our company will support your company in accountancy and bookkeeping service. We will care about your TAX, VAT Return. We will process your payrolls, vat applications. We will take care about your finance. Let us help you.
Registered Address Service
Our company offers prestigious street address in central London that can provide a polished image for your business and allow you to keep your business and personal lives separate. If you do not have UK address this is perfect solution for you.
Nominee Secretary Service
ABS can provide a nominee company secretary for your private limited company. The nominee company secretary service is ideal for sole directors unable to find someone to take on this role.
Apostille and Legalization
Do you need special documents certify by Companies House with apostille legalization. Please review our service.
VAT Registration
If you wish we can register your company for VAT on your behalf, by using the VAT Online Registration Service.
Companies House Web Filing
All registered companies are required to submit a variety of information on their business activities. Also you need notify Companies House about all changes in your company. If you do not provide this information your company will be proposed for liquidation. Our company offers Companies House Filing Service - with this service you can amend all necessary information. With this service you can promptly fulfil Companies' House requirements.
Opening Bank Account
All companies after company formation in order to start trading need to open bank account. ABS can offer you introductions to all of the major UK banks
Phone Numbers
We are one of the UK's leading suppliers of Non Geographic Numbers, Memorable Numbers, Geographic Numbers and Premium Rate Numbers. All of our Numbers can be Routed to Landline or Mobile Destinations anywhere in the World, or be used as an Inbound Number or as a Fax to Email Number
























THE BASICS
Legal structures
Where and what company?
To put your business on a proper footing with HM Revenue & Customs and other authorities, you need to make sure that it has the right legal structure. It's worth thinking carefully about which structure best suits the way that you do business, as this will affect:
- the tax and National Insurance that you pay
- the records and accounts that you have to keep
- your financial liability if the business runs into trouble
- the ways your business can raise money
- the way management decisions are made about the business
There are several structures to choose from, depending on your situation. This guide will help you understand the differences between them. If you are not sure which legal structure would best suit your business, please contact us for professional advice.
Sole trader
Being a sole trader is the simplest way to run a business, and does not involve paying any registration fees. Keeping records and accounts is straightforward, and you get to keep all the profits. But you are personally liable for any debts that your business runs up, which can make this a risky option for businesses that need a lot of investment.
Management and raising finance
You make all the decisions on how to manage your business. You raise money for the business out of your own assets, and/or with loans from banks or other lenders.
Records and accounts
You have to make an annual self assessment tax return to HMRC. You must also keep records showing your business income and expenses.
Profits
Any profits go to you.
Tax and National Insurance
As you are self-employed, your profits are taxed as income. You need to pay fixed-rate Class 2 National Insurance contributions (NICs) and Class 4 NICs on your profits.
Liability
As a sole trader, you are personally responsible for any debts run up by your business. This means your home or other assets may be at risk if your business runs into trouble.
Set-up
Please overview our service.
Partnership
In a partnership, two or more people share the risks, costs, and responsibilities of being in business. Each partner is self-employed and takes a share of the profits. Usually, each partner shares in the decision-making and is personally responsible for any debts that the business runs up. Unlike a limited company, a partnership has no legal existence distinct from the partners themselves. If one of the partners resigns, dies or goes bankrupt, the partnership must be dissolved but the business may not need to cease.A partnership is a relatively simple and flexible way for two or more people to own and run a business together. However, partners do not enjoy any protection if the business fails.
Management and raising finance
Partners themselves usually manage the business, though they can delegate responsibilities to employees. Partners raise money for the business out of their own assets, and/or with loans. It's possible to have 'sleeping' partners who contribute money to the business but are not involved in running it.
Records and accounts
The partnership itself and each individual partner must make annual self-assessment returns to HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC). The partnership must keep records showing business income and expenses.
Profits
Each partner takes a share of the profits.
Tax and National Insurance
As partners are self-employed, they are taxed on their share of the profits. Each partner needs to pay fixed-rate Class 2 National Insurance contributions (NICs) and Class 4 NICs.
Liability
In England, Wales and Northern Ireland, partners are jointly liable for debts owed by the partnership and so are equally responsible for paying off the whole debt. They are not severally liable, which would mean each partner is responsible for paying off the entire debt. Partners in Scotland are both jointly and severally liable
Set-up
Each partner needs to register as self-employed. It's a good idea to draw up a written agreement between the partners. Please see our service for self employment registration.
Limited liability partnership (LLP)
A limited liability partnership (LLP) is similar to an ordinary partnership - in that a number of individuals or limited companies share in the risks, costs, responsibilities and profits of the business. The difference is that liability is limited to the amount of money they have invested in the business and to any personal guarantees they have given to raise finance. This means that members have some protection if the business runs into trouble.
Management and raising finance
Usually the members manage the business, but can delegate responsibilities to employees. Members raise money out of their own assets, and/or with loans.
Records and accounts
The LLP itself and each individual member must make annual self-assessment returns to HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC). All LLPs must file accounts with Companies House. An annual return will be sent to the members before the anniversary of incorporation each year.
Profits
Each member takes an equal share of the profits, unless the members agreement specifies otherwise.
Tax and National Insurance
Members of a partnership are taxed on their share of profits and pay the tax and National Insurance contributions (NICs), according to their business structure. An individual will pay income tax and NICs, and a limited company member will pay corporation tax. The profits of a member of an LLP is taxable as profits of a trade, profession or vocation and members remain self-employed and subject to Class 2 and 4 NICs.
Liability
The liability is limited to the amount of money they have invested in the business and to any personal guarantees they have given to raise finance. This means that members have some protection if the business runs into trouble.
Set-up
There is no restriction on the number of members, but at least two must be designated members - the law places extra responsibilities on them. If the LLP reduces in number and there are fewer than two designated members then every member is deemed to be a designated member. LLPs must register at Companies House. It's a good idea to draw up a written agreement between the members. Please see our service LLP Start Up.
Limited liability companies (LTD, PLC)
Limited companies exist in their own right. This means the company's finances are distinct from the personal finances of their owners. Shareholders may be individuals or other companies. They are not responsible for the company's debts unless they have given guarantees (of a bank loan, for example). However, they may lose the money they have invested in the company if it fails.

There are four main types of company:
Private company limited by shares (LTD)- members' liability is limited to the amount unpaid on shares they hold. This includes those community interest companies (CICs) which are private companies limited by shares.
Private company limited by guarantee - members' liability is limited to the amount they have agreed to contribute to the company's assets if it is wound up. This includes all RTM (Right to Manage) companies-, commonhold associations and those community interest companies which are companies limited by guarantee.
Private unlimited company - there is no limit to the members' liability.
Public limited company (PLC) - the company's shares may be offered for sale to the general public and members' liability is limited to the amount unpaid on shares held by them. This also includes community interest public limited companies. (that is, CICs which are PLCs). A plc must have issued shares to a value of at least £50,000 before it can trade.

Management and raising finance
A director or board of directors make the management decisions. Finance comes from shareholders, borrowing and retained profits. Public limited companies can raise money by selling shares on the stock market, but private limited companies cannot.
Records and accounts
Accounts are filed with Companies House and Inland Revenue with Tax Return. A "shuttle" annual return will be sent before the anniversary of incorporation each year. It needs checking, amending and returning to Companies. The directors and secretary are responsible for notifying Companies House of changes in the structure and management of the business.
Profits
Profits are usually distributed to shareholders in the form of dividends, apart from profits retained in the business as working capital. Distributions to individuals by companies with taxable profits subject to a zero rate of corporation tax carry a minimum of 19 per cent corporation tax.
Tax and National Insurance
Companies pay corporation tax and must make an annual return to HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC). Company directors are employees of the company and must pay Class 1 National Insurance contributions as well as income tax on their salaries. If your company or organisation has any taxable income or profits, you must tell HMRC that your company exists and that it is liable to tax.
Liability
Shareholders are not personally responsible for the company's debts, but directors may be asked to give personal guarantees of loans to the company.
Set-up
Must be registered (incorporated) at Companies House. Must have at least one director (two if it's a plc) and a company secretary, who may also be shareholders. In a plc, the company secretary must be professionally qualified. From October 2008, it will no longer be necessary for private limited companies to have a company secretary. Please see our service in order to register LTD company (by shares or by guarnatee)or PLC company .
Overview of legal structures
Sole trader
The advantages of being a sole trader include independence, ease of set up and running, and that all the profits go to you. The disadvantages include a lack of support, unlimited liability and the fact that you are personally responsible for any debts run up by your business.
Partnership
Advantages of being in a partnership include its ease of set up and running, and the range of skills and experience that the partners can bring to the business. On the other hand, problems can occur when there are disagreements between partners, there is unlimited liability, and, as a partner, you are personally responsible for any debts that the business runs up.
Limited liability partnership (LLP)
LLPs retain the flexibility of a partnership as opposed to the rigid structure of a limited company, and your personal liability is limited. There is no restriction on the number of members, but at least two must be "designated members" - the law places extra responsibilities on them. However, the formation of an LLP is more complex and costly than that of a partnership and problems can occur when there are disagreements between the members. If the number of partners is reduced, and there are fewer than two designated members, then every member is deemed to be a designated member.
Limited liability company
In a limited liability company your personal financial risk will be restricted to how much you invest in the business and any guarantees you have given in order to obtain financing. But you should remember that this type of company also brings a range of extra legal duties, including the maintenance of the company's public records, eg filing of accounts.